Teenage online dating statistics

These are some of the key themes and responses we heard during these data-gathering sessions. And I met a girl on there and she lived up in [location]. Half of all teens (50%) have let someone know they were interested in them romantically by friending them on Facebook or another social media site, and 47% have expressed their attraction by liking, commenting or otherwise interacting with that person on social media.

Some 35% of teens have some type of experience in a romantic relationship, a figure that includes current and former daters, as well as those in serious and less-serious relationships. Teens also spoke about social media as an information-gathering tool that helps them find out all sorts of information about a potential partner, like whether they are dating someone or not.

Aside from in-person flirting, social media is the most common way teens express interest in someone they have a crush on.

Although most teen romantic relationships do not start online, digital platforms serve as an important tool for flirting and showing romantic interest.

Only 8% of teens say they have met a romantic partner online.

Social media and mobile technology now permeate the lives of many teens, including their romantic relationships.

Adolescent girls who reported dating violence were 60 percent more likely to report one or more suicide attempts in the past year, the survey found, and males who reported sexual assault were four times as likely to have attempted suicide.

A history of sexual assault in females and a history of dating violence in males did not increase the rates of attempted suicide, which is the third leading cause of death for adolescents.

It's no surprise that teen dating in the digital age is a lot different from the old days of passing notes and waiting by the phone.

For today's teens, social media and modern technology play a huge role in how high school couples meet, communicate and break-up.